Ray's musings and humor

Nostalgia is a file that removes the rough edges from the good old days.

Doug Larson

1940s-street-scene

I am not one of those who think that there is not a lot in today’s world that is better than it was years ago. For example I would not be visiting with you each day if not for the internet. In many ways I have benefited from better health care, a vibrant city and the opportunity for extensive travel. It is quite a contrast to what the world was like in my youth and yet I still long for some of what we had. We saw each other more, families stayed together, neighbors were friends and maybe best of all we generally shared the same experiences. Most of you are younger than I am, in fact probably much younger so if you don’t mind I am going to give you peak back at the world I grew up in courtesy of this poem sent me years ago by a friend.

 

I remember when

A little house with three bedrooms and one car on the street,

A mower that you had to push to make the grass look neat.

In the kitchen on the wall we only had one phone,

And no need for recording things, someone was always home.

We only had a living room where we would congregate,

Unless it was at mealtime then in the kitchen where we ate.

We had no need for family rooms or extra rooms to dine,

When meeting as a family those two rooms would work out fine.

We only had one TV set, and channels maybe two,

But always there was one of them with something worth the view.

For snacks we had potato chips that tasted like a chip,

And if you wanted flavor there was Lipton’s® onion dip.

Store-bought snacks were rare because my mother liked to cook,

And nothing can compare to snacks in Betty Crocker’s® book.

The snacks were even healthy with the best ingredients,

No labels with a hundred things that make not a bit of sense.

Weekends were for family trips or staying home to play,

We all did things together — even go to church to pray.

When we did our weekend trips depending on the weather,

No one stayed at home because we liked to be together.

Sometimes we would separate to do things on our own,

But we knew where the others were without our own cell phone.

Then there were the movies with your favorite movie star,

And nothing can compare to watching movies in your car.

Then there were the picnics at the peak of summer season,

Pack a lunch and find some trees and never need a reason.

Get a baseball game together with all the friends you know,

Have real action playing ball — and no game video.

Remember when the doctor used to be the family friend,

And didn’t need insurance or a lawyer to defend?

The way that he took care of you or what he had to do,

Because he took an oath and strived to do the best for you.

Remember going to the store and shopping casually,

And when you went to pay for it you used your own money?

Nothing that you had to swipe or punch in some amount,

Remember when the cashier person had to really count?

Remember when we breathed the air; it smelled so fresh and clean,

And chemicals were not used on the grass to keep it green.

The milkman and the bread man used to go from door to door,

And it was just a few cents more than going to the store.

There was a time when mailed letters came right to your door,

Without a lot of junk mail ads sent out by every store.

The mailman knew each house by name and knew where it was sent;

There were not loads of mail addressed to “present occupant.”

Remember when the words “I do” meant that you really did,

And not just temporarily ’til someone blows their lid.

T’was no such thing as “no one’s fault; we just made a mistake,”

There was a time when married life was built on give and take.

There was a time when just one glance was all that it would take,

And you would know the kind of car, the model and the make.

They didn’t look like turtles trying to squeeze out every mile;

They were streamlined, white walls fins, and really had some style.

One time the music that you played whenever you would jive,

Was from a vinyl, big-holed record called a forty-five.

The record player had a post to keep them all in line,

And then the records would drop down and play one at a time.

Oh sure, we had our problems then, just like we do today,

And always we were striving, trying for a better way.

And every year that passed us by brought new and greater things,

We now can even program phones with music or with rings.

Oh, the simple life we lived still seems like so much fun,

How can you explain a game, just kick the can and run?

And why would boys put baseball cards between bicycle spokes,

And for a nickel red machines had little bottled Cokes?

This life seemed so much easier and slower in some ways,

I love the new technology but I sure miss those days.

So time moves on and so do we, and nothing stays the same,

But I sure love to reminisce and walk down memory lane.

~~~

“Enjoy yourself. These are the good old days you’re going to miss in the years ahead.”

~~~

At the Henry Street Hebrew School, Mr. Goldblatt, the new teacher, finished the day’s lesson.  It was now time for the usual question period. “Mr. Goldblatt,” announced little Joey, “there’s somethin’ I can’t figger out.”

“What’s that Joey?” asked Goldblatt.

“Well accordin’ to the Bible, the Children of Israel crossed the Red Sea, right?”

“Right.”

“An’ the Children of Israel beat up the Philistines, right?”

“Er–right.”

“An’ the Children of Israel built the Temple, right?”

“Again you’re right.”

“An’ the Children of Israel fought the ‘gyptians, an’ the Children of Israel fought the Romans, an’ the Children of Israel wuz always doin’ somethin’ important, right?”

“All that is right, too,” agreed Goldblatt, “So, what’s your question?”

“What I wanna know is this,” demanded Joey,

“What wuz all the grown-ups doin'”?

~~~

I am meandering to a different drummer.

~~~

A man’s car was stalled in the middle of a busy street, and the woman behind him honked continuously as he tried to restart it.  Finally, the man got out and walked to the woman’s car.

“I can’t seem to get my car started,” the man said, smiling.  “If you’ll go and start it for me, I’ll stay here and lean on your horn.”

~~~

I’m not tense, just terribly, terribly alert.

~~~

My exercise tips:

Exercise early in the morning before your brain figures out what you are doing.

I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me.

If you are going to try cross country skiing, start with a small country.

~~~

A father was reading his paper one day when his son came in and said, “Dad, will you take me to the zoo tomorrow?”

“No,” said his father, “If they want you, they can come and get you.”

~~~

The best part is still ahead of me – I haven’t experienced my ‘good old days’ yet.

Luther Vandross

~~~

Stay well, do good work, and have fun.

Ray Mitchell

Indianapolis, Indiana

Management is not responsible for duplicates from previous dailies. The editor is somewhat senile.

This daily is sent only to special people who want to start their day on an upbeat. If you have system overload because of our daily clutter, let me know and I will send you the information via mental telepathy. If you have not been getting our daily you can request to be added by e-mailing me at raykiwsp@gmail.com. Back issues are posted at https://raykiwsp.wordpress.com/ currently there are about 2000 readers from around the world.

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