Ray's musings and humor

I hear music!

Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.

Maya Angelou

 

After spending five days homebound with a severe cold I am about to break out. Tomorrow morning I will cure my cabin fever by having breakfast with someone truly interesting, the archivist of what I believe to be Americas best repository of popular music that includes thousands of pieces of sheet music, old recordings, memorabilia and books covering 20th Century’s great American popular music. I have yet to leave the music of the past and have a streaming radio next to my bed where I dose off each night to the music I love.

My friend has the responsibility of cataloging and managing this huge and growing collection of something of great value. If you would like to know about the collection and Michael Feinstein Great American Songbook Foundation you can do so at http://www.thecenterfortheperformingarts.org/Great-American-Songbook-Inititative.aspx. Here in part is a description of what is included in its collections.

 

The “Great American Songbook”, sometimes referred to as “American Standards”, is the uniquely American collection of popular music from Broadway and Hollywood musicals prevalent from the 1920s to 1960s. Familiar composers include George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Harold Arlen, and Richard Rodgers. Singers include Frank Sinatra, Al Jolson, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Judy Garland, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Mel Torme and so many others.

This timeless music offered hope of better days during the Great Depression, built morale during two world wars, helped build social bridges within our culture, and whistled beside us during economic growth. We defended our country, raised families, and built a nation to these songs.

The songwriters of the Great American Songbook translated positive values and an optimistic spirit into the soundtrack of American life. These values are as true and applicable today as they ever have been. Through our work, we hope to educate today’s youth about the relevance of the Great American Songbook and its connection to current popular music

 

All I can say is what a great way to start the rest of my feel-good breakout activities, breakfast with someone with a fascinating job who lives amongst the memories of the good times and bad times of the past. Much of my lifetime was lived in a more audio world without TV, we found warmth, solace and comfort in music that provided hope during some of the most difficult periods of the 20th century. I am glad that Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and their contemporaries have left behind their music that continues to brighten my life as time marches on.

By the way, one of the great byproducts of doing the Daily every day is what I often find along the way. Today I struck gold, if you are like I am and love the music of the past you have got to visit http://songbook1.wordpress.com/, the music of the past at your fingertips, what a great gift.

~~~

True music must repeat the thought and inspirations of the people and the time. My people are Americans and my time is today.

George Gershwin

~~~

Flying Rules

1. Every takeoff is optional. Every landing is mandatory.

2. If you push the stick forward, the houses get bigger. If you pull the stick back, they get smaller. That is, unless you keep pulling the stick all the way back, then they get bigger again.

3. Flying isn’t dangerous. Crashing is what’s dangerous.

4. It’s always better to be down here wishing you were up there than up there wishing you were down here.

5. The ONLY time you have too much fuel is when you’re on fire.

6. The propeller is just a big fan in front of the plane used to keep the pilot cool. When it stops, you can actually watch the pilot start sweating.

7. When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No one has ever collided with the sky.

8. A ‘good’ landing is one from which you can walk away. A ‘great’ landing is one after which they can use the plane again.

9. Learn from the mistakes of others. You won’t live long enough to make all of them yourself.

10. You know you’ve landed with the wheels up if it takes full power to taxi to the ramp.

11. The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa.

12. Never let an aircraft take you somewhere your brain didn’t get to five minutes earlier.

13. Stay out of clouds. The silver lining everyone keeps talking about might be another airplane going in the opposite direction. Reliable sources also report that mountains have been known to hide out in clouds.

14. Always try to keep the number of landings you make equal to the number of take offs you’ve made.

15. There are three simple rules for making a smooth landing. Unfortunately no one knows what they are.

16. You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck.

17. Helicopters can’t fly; they’re just so ugly the earth repels them.

18. If all you can see out of the window is ground that’s going round and round and all you can hear is commotion coming from the passenger compartment, things are not at all as they should be.

19. In the ongoing battle between objects made of aluminum going hundreds of miles per hour and the ground going zero miles per hour, the ground has yet to lose.

20. Good judgment comes from experience. Unfortunately, the experience usually comes from bad judgment.

21. It’s always a good idea to keep the pointy end going forward as much as possible.

22. Keep looking around. There’s always something you’ve missed.

23. Remember, gravity is not just a good idea. It’s the law. And it’s not subject to repeal.

24. The four most useless things to a pilot are the altitude above you, runway behind you, gas back at the airport, and a tenth of a second ago.

25. There are old pilots and there are bold pilots. There are, however, no old, bold pilots.

~~~

“The healthiest people are often those who laugh at themselves. No wonder, laughter is the best medicine.”

~~~

A medieval astrologer prophesied to a king that his favorite mistress would soon die.  Sure enough, the woman died a short time later.  The king was outraged at the astrologer, certain that his prophecy had brought about the woman’s death.  He summoned the astrologer and commanded him: “Tell me when you will die!”

The astrologer realized that the king was planning to kill him immediately, no matter what answer he gave.  “I do not know when I will die,” he answered finally.  “I only know that whenever I die, the king will die three days later….”

~~~

Joy, sorrow, tears, lamentation, laughter — to all these music gives voice, but in such a way that we are transported from the world of unrest to a world of peace, and see reality in a new way, as if we were sitting by a mountain lake and contemplating hills and woods and clouds in the tranquil and fathomless water.

Albert Schweitzer

~~~

Stay well, do good work, and have fun.

Ray Mitchell

Indianapolis, Indiana

Management is not responsible for duplicates from previous dailies. The editor is somewhat senile

This daily is sent only to special people who want to start their day on an upbeat. If you have system overload because of our daily clutter, let me know and I will send you the information via mental telepathy. If you have not been getting our daily you can request to be added by e-mailing me at raykiwsp@gmail.com. Back issues are posted at https://raykiwsp.wordpress.com/ currently there are about 2000 readers from around the world.

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