Ray's musings and humor

You can be a triple winner!

"It hit me very early on that something was terribly wrong, that I would see silos full of food and supermarkets full of food, and kids starving. … In Fair Trade, we see ourselves as this infinitesimal part of the world economy. But somebody’s got to come up with an alternative model that says children eating is No. 1."

Medea Benjamin, co-founder, Global Exchange

 

 

One of my favorite stores in Indianapolis is Global Gifts, a not-for-profit business committed to serving impoverished artisans and producers in the developing world by:

  • Providing vital fair income and employment for people of limited opportunity;
  • Marketing ethically produced and ethically obtained handmade products;
  • Educating the public about the cultures and traditions associated with items they sell; and
  • Helping consumers spend their shopping dollars in ways that benefit impoverished peoples around the world.

 

A visit to Global Gifts is a unique experience.  Shoppers appreciate that items are a product of centuries of talent and techniques passed down from generation to generation.  Their products are hand-made by artisans spanning the globe and representing over 35 countries, mostly from the developing regions of the world. At Global Gifts you will find, jewelry, pottery, beautiful textiles, wood and stone carvings, musical instruments, basketry, handmade cards and stationery, toys and games, nativities and holiday items, fairly traded organic coffee, teas and chocolate, and much more.

 

This coming Friday and Saturday Global Gifts will donate 10% of the sales at both their downtown and north side stores to my Kiwanis Clubs annual Clothe-a-Child project when buyers let the clerks know that they are friends of Kiwanis. Those shoppers who do will be triple winners; they will get great products at very competitive prices, they will be helping sustain artisans and producers in other parts of the world, and they will help my fellow Kiwanis members provide winter clothes to needy kids at Christmas.

 

If you are in Indy please stop by Global gifts this Friday or Saturday, I think you will be glad you did. If you don’t know where the global Gifts stores are located let me know, I’ll tell you where they are and who knows I might even open the door for you. If you are too far away to shop In Indianapolis, look for a fair trade store in your area and visit them, I think you will be pleased.

~~~

"When people become economically empowered, they gain political and social power. Many of the groups that we work with do more than just produce crafts; they’re involved in community development, health and education. For the women we work with, the effect is even greater. As they gain employment, they become able to leave abusive situations, to seek legal assistance, to acquire education, to become independent. Their work allows them to be economically significant in the family and gives them leverage to be considered an equal."

Bob Chase, executive director, SERRV International

~~~

Q: How many internet mail list subscribers does it take to change a light bulb?

A: 1,343 –

1 to change the light bulb and to post to the mail list that the light bulb has been changed;

14 to share similar experiences of changing light bulbs and how the light bulb could have been changed differently;

7 to caution about the dangers of changing light bulbs;

27 to point out spelling/grammar errors in posts about changing light bulbs;

53 to flame the spell checkers;

41 to correct spelling/grammar flames;

6 to argue over whether it’s "lightbulb" or "light bulb"

156 to write to the list administrator about the light bulb discussion and its inappropriateness to this mail list;

109 to post that this list is not about light bulbs and to please take this email exchange to litebulblist;

203 to demand that cross posting to grammar-l, spelling-l and illuminati-l about changing light bulbs be stopped;

111 to defend the posting to this list saying that we all use light bulbs and therefore the posts *are* relevant to this mail list;

306 to debate which method of changing light bulbs is superior, where to buy the best light bulbs, what brand of light bulbs work best for this technique and what brands are faulty;

27 to post URL’s where one can see examples of different light bulbs;

14 to post that the URL’s were posted incorrectly and the post the corrected URL’s;

3 to post about links they found from the URL’s that are relevant to this list which makes light bulbs relevant to this list;

33 to link all posts to date, then quote them including all headers and footers and then add "Me too";

12 to post to the list that they are unsubscribing because they cannot handle the light bulb controversy;

19 to quote the "Me too’s" to say "Me three";

4 to suggest that posters request the light bulb FAQ;

44 to ask what is "FAQ";

4 to say "didn’t we go through this already a short time ago on Usenet?"

143 to ask "what’s Usenet?"

~~~

“Those who bring sunshine into the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves.”

James Matthew Barrie

~~~

At a business conference in Montpelier, Vermont, the state tax commissioner asked the audience which sort of taxation they found fairest. There was a pause, and then a white haired man in the back raised his hand. "The poll tax," he said.

"But the poll tax was repealed," replied the commissioner.

"Ay-ah," declared the man, "that’s what I like best about it."

~~~

“In the end, the size of a person’s accomplishment can best be measured by the size of their heart.”

~~~

My friend Ida was slowly recovering from a heart attack. "Doctor," she pleaded with her cardiologist, "you must keep me alive for the next two years. I want to attend my first grandchild’s bar mitzvah."

"We’ll try," he replied compassionately.

In due course Ida gratefully attended the festive rite of passage.

Some time later she again spoke to her doctor. "My granddaughter is to be married in 18 months. Please help me to be able to attend her wedding."

"We’ll do our best," he replied.

And my friend happily attended her granddaughter’s wedding.

Ten years passed. Ida visited her cardiologist regularly and followed his instructions religiously. One morning she called him. "Doctor," she began, "I’m feeling fine, but I have another request to ask of you: Remember how you saw me through to my grandson’s bar mitzvah?"

"Yes."

"And later how you helped me attend my granddaughter’s wedding?"

"Yes."

"Well, as you know I’ve just celebrated my 80th birthday. And I just bought myself a new mattress."

"Yes?"

"It has a 20-year guarantee…"

~~~

Cherishing children is the mark of a civilized society.

Joan Ganz Cooney

~~~

Stay well, do good work, and have fun.

 Ray Mitchell

Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Management is not responsible for duplicates from previous dailies.

The editor is somewhat senile.

This daily is sent only to special people who want to start their day on an upbeat. If you have system overload because of our daily clutter, let me know and I will send you the information via mental telepathy. If you have not been getting our daily you can join at http://groups.google.com/group/Rays-Daily. Back issues are posted at http://360.yahoo.com/raykiwsp currently there are about 500 readers from all over the world.

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